The glass bottle is the container par excellence used for storing wine because the glass manages to maintain the organoleptic characteristics of the wine over time.


But not all bottles are created equal. You will have seen a Demi (or Half bottle) of passito or a Magnum of an important wine several times, but do you know that there are bottles up to 30 liters? Let's see them together:


NameCapacity (liters)
Quarter0.2
Chopin
0.25
Demi0.375
Bottle0.75
Magnum1.5
Jéroboam3
Réhoboam

4.5

Mathusalem

6

Salmanazar

9

Nabuchodonosor

15

Solomon

20

Sovereign

25

Primat o Goliath

27

Melchizédech

30


You will have immediately noticed that many names refer to the names of great kings and rulers of antiquity. Wine merchants, especially Champagne merchants, from the 19th century realized that bottles of different sizes from the standard one were requested and purchased mainly at particular times of the year, coinciding with important festivals or events rich in pomp. They therefore decided to use equally special and prestigious names to recognize these bottles.

However, we are fundamentally not interested in these historical anecdotes. Let's get to the point: does size matter? Does the size of the bottle affect our wine? The answer is YES to both questions.

In proportion to the volume, the larger the bottle, the less wine will be in contact with oxygen, with the glass and with the cork. The wine then reaches maturity more slowly, evolves in a more stable and protected way, better resisting temperature changes and the negative effects of exposure to light.

In summary, the larger bottles allow for better storage and better evolution of the wine.